archives

immigrants

This tag is associated with 3 posts

A Year of Yes: Helping young people who are newcomers to the US make a life here in NYC

What impact are current developments in immigration laws having on New Yorkers? How can we help NYC public high school students resolve their immigration status – and what are their stories?

Join the Immigration Project of Volunteers of Legal Service (VOLS) on Friday, July 27th at Caveat for a lively talk about the current legal landscape and its actual impacts on our clients, as well as a screening of the documentary _4 Stories for New York_. This 29 minute documentary features four clients of the VOLS Immigration Project sharing personal stories about their immigration trajectory, including the role legal assistance played in their lives. Elizabeta Markuci, Director of the Immigration Project at VOLS, will lead a discussion on immigration law developments, including Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) litigation and legislation.

The mission of the VOLS Immigration Project is to resolve immigration issues for New York City public high school students so that they can work, attend college and have an opportunity to achieve the American Dream. VOLS recruits, trains, and mentors pro bono lawyers to help these youth overcome their immigration issues and give them a chance to succeed. Proceeds of the event benefit the Immigration Project, allowing the Project to continue and augment our important work in securing the immigration status of vulnerable NYC youth.

Tickets available at:
https://volsimmigration.eventbrite.com

Doors 6pm, program 6:30pm. Friday, July 27th, 2018 at Caveat, 21A Clinton Street, New York, NY 10002. Seating is limited and on a first-come, first-served basis – arrive at 6:00pm for best seating.

If you cannot attend, please consider making a donation by following the same link for tickets. More information on the Immigration Project is available at http://www.volsprobono.org/projects/immigration-project

In the pause: An immigrant’s fortune was made in yogurt

This month’s Fast Company features Hamdi Ulukaya, the Founder of Chobani, in its cover story. A Kurdish immigrant who moved here to go to college after facing persecution in his home country and without speaking a word of English, Hamdi is an inspiring figure in business and in life. If you want to feel hopeful about America and the good that capitalism can do, I highly recommend reading the article. Once I started reading it, I couldn’t put it down and all I want to do is eat Chobani yogurt and learn more about this fascinating man. With a lot of hard work and the right intentions, it’s amazing what the human imagination can accomplish.

In the pause: The doors of this country stay open

To my friends who are immigrants and to my friends who are Muslim, please know that there are many people (myself included) who stand and will continue to stand in solidarity with you and your families. I will march with you, fight for you, donate money to the ACLU Nationwide for you, and volunteer my time, talents, and efforts to make this country safe for you. The doors of this country stay open, as they were to my grandparents and to the ancestors of everyone else I know who calls America home. On my walk around my D.C. neighborhood with Phineas today, I saw signs of welcoming, acceptance, love, and resistance everywhere. I wanted to share these with you so that you know you are not alone, not now, not ever. We are here, and we’re not going anywhere.

20170129_11494920170129_11074120170129_11585120170129_120209

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Follow Me On Twitter

My Goodreads

Follow me on Instagram

No Instagram images were found.

Translate this blog to another language

%d bloggers like this: